But when it came to love, Isaac was anything but lazy. He would wind up all of his engines and often lost himself in the story. His relentless enthusiasm would take him for a ride and he just couldn’t curb his expectations. He kept coming up with premature conclusions, inaccurate assumptions, and wild projections, over and over again.  

“Am I the best hound to teach people how to love?”, Isaac asked himself after a couple of repetitive failures. 

He was. He just didn’t know it yet.

In his overexcited youthful attitude, he just couldn’t appreciate enough the changes he brought into people’s lives. Picturing the long-term effects of his lessons was a challenge. After all, for him, love was always in the now. 

“People wear those solemn, sober faces all the time. It’s like they carry the whole world on their shoulders,” he told Shark, as the two best friends wandered around the train station while they were looking for a new person to teach a love lesson among the commuters. 

Shark was a corgi-turned-stray dog and Isaac’s best pal. He got his nickname from his new street gang because he proudly owned the strongest muzzle in the block.

After his owner Matias left him on the street, he asked so many questions that confused him. The most common one was “How could someone that loved me for so long leave me like that?” 

But he just had to accept his fate and quickly became accustomed to street life. He was a cheerful corgi with a weird temper. As much as Isaac was agreeable, Shark was confrontational.

But they got along well, learned a lot from each other, and were the best partners on Marshall’s team for healing broken hearts. Despite their strong impulses to handle things fast, they still had the highest success rate in around dozens of blocks in the neighborhood. 

“Do you think this stellar reputation will follow us around for a long time?”, Issac checked with his friend with a doubtful face.

“Relax, dog”, Shark nodded in his laid-back manner, without uttering a bark. 

If a human had observed how Shark and Isaac communicated, they would have noticed just a couple of dogs wandering around the train station. The canine couple looked just like the standard strays that are looking for restaurant leftovers or a warm cardboard shelter. 

Most people wouldn’t have a clue that they were constantly communicating. Most people, but not all of them, as we will later see – a gifted autistic boy and a wondrous vet with the biggest heart somehow got to understand them. 

As a general rule, humans didn’t understand the hound language. Save for the common dog vocabulary, Isaac and Shark also had their jargon and a long history of inside jokes accumulated over the four years they hung out together under Marshall’s mentorship. 

“Humans give too much credit to words, bro!”, said Shark. 

“All they do is talk, talk, talk, and forget to listen. No wonder they don’t understand each other!” 

Shark oozed confidence as his friend stuck out his tongue and looked at him with a smile.

”I know, Shark. They rarely listen. Especially their own hearts!”, blurbed Isaac as he recalled the special skill that sometimes cost him dearly. He remembered his recent failures and wondered if he was truly qualified to teach lessons in love. 

“There, my sucker confidence took the better of me again!”, Isaac didn’t let his mind drift into the vulnerable territory as he and his bud concentrated on the task at hand.

Stories of Dogs and People (biljanaognenova.com) participates in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn commissions by linking to Amazon. When you buy books or other products and services from on Amazon from a link on here, I earn a small commission. 

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.